Home > Czech Literature, EU Book Tour, Literary UFO, Non Fiction, Ouředník Patrik, TBR20 > Europeana: A Brief History of the Twentieth Century by Patrik Ouředník

Europeana: A Brief History of the Twentieth Century by Patrik Ouředník

Europeana. A Brief History of the Twentieth Century by Patrik Ouředník (2001) French title: Europeana. Une brève histoire du XXè siècle. Translated from the Czech by Marianne Canavaggio.

Patrik Ouředník is a Czech writer born in 1957. He emigrated to France in 1984. He translated Rabelais, Alfred Jarry, Raymond Queneau and Samuel Beckett into Czech. Despite his excellent French and his living in France, he still writes his books in Czech. I understand that it must be hard to write in another language but I wonder why his books are not self-translated into French.

I bought Europeana. A Brief History of the Twentieth Century after reading Ouředník’s literary UFO, Ad Acta. As its title says it, Europeana is a subjective/objective history of Europe in the 20th century. Why subjective/objective? Subjective, because Ouředník decides which facts he relates and in which order. Objective because all the facts are true, no fake news to make the buzz here.

To give you an idea of his style and his tone, here’s the first page of the book. (English translation by Gerald Turner)

The Americans who fell in Normandy in 1944 were tall men measuring 173 centimeters on average, and if they were laid head to foot they would measure 38 kilometers. The Germans were tall too, while the tallest of all were the Senegalese fusiliers in the First World War who measured 176 centimeters, and so they were sent into battle on the front lines in order to scare the Germans. It was said of the First World War that people in it fell like seeds and the Russian Communists later calculated how much fertilizer a square kilometer of corpses would yield and how much they would save on expensive foreign fertilizers if they used the corpses of traitors and criminals instead of manure. And the English invented the tank and the Germans invented gas, which was known as yperite because the Germans first used it near the town of Ypres, although apparently that was not true, and it was also called mustard because it stung the nose like Dijon mustard, and that was apparently true, and some soldiers who returned home after the war did not want to eat Dijon mustard again.

The 150 pages of the book are made of the same cloth. Europeana is the accumulation of odd and random facts. They are told in this playful tone but some of them are dreadful. Ouředník covers the twentieth century in all aspects. He mixes singular information, excerpts from surveys and historical facts. It blends sociology and history. It puts the stress on all kinds of events that built the 20th century in an organized / disorganized kind of way. It questions the idea of history, how we tell it, how we highlight some facts and not others and how this choice affects the global picture that we have of an era. Ouředník does not concentrate only on politics and wars but also on the changes in mores, on progress in science. He reminds us that art and pop culture are part of our history.

His being from Eastern Europe brings another angle to Europe’s history. He doesn’t gloss over the brutal communist dictatorships in Eastern countries and that’s fortunate. Despite mentioning culture, science and mores, the 20th century remains a century of horrors. It’s full of mass killings and dictatorships. Italy, Spain and then the Nazi plague followed by the Communist cholera. Totalitarianism bloomed in this century, leaving millions of victims in its wake. This is not new. What’s new is how he assembles facts and how he lines them up like beads on a necklace. It’s almost absurd, ludicrous and it’s not a surprise coming from a man who translated Rabelais, Jarry and Beckett.

It looks absurd but everything is true. We’re not reading Ubu Rex a king we know never existed. We’re reading true facts. In this age of Brexit and Fake News, Europeana is a good way to remember why the EU was created and why journalism and facts matter.

I have one reservation, though. I enjoyed reading Europeana and it’s good to read it in small doses because the number of facts becomes overwhelming after a while. It’s also a reminder that the accumulation of information saturates the brain. Things blend and we lose our capacity to absorb what we read and process it. We lose our ability to be upset, to oppose to Something because it’s soon pushed to the back of our mind by other information. Now, I’d be totally unable to quote exact facts from the book. Either we consider it’s one of the book’s weakness or we consider that it’s one of its strengths because it shows how limited we are in remembering data.

Has anyone read Europeana too? If yes, what did you think of it?

  1. July 1, 2017 at 1:44 pm

    I’ve got this on my TBR, I can’t remember who recommended it to me….

    Like

    • July 1, 2017 at 8:43 pm

      I can’t help you. I don’t think that was me. I’m curious to read your review.

      Like

      • July 2, 2017 at 10:52 am

        I’ll get to it one of these days:)

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        • July 4, 2017 at 9:40 pm

          Sure! One little book in the whole TBR!

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  2. July 2, 2017 at 2:15 am

    I haven’t read it and I won’t as it would drive me crazy I think. You don’t read a lot of non fiction, do you?

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    • July 4, 2017 at 9:39 pm

      I don’t read a lot of non-fiction. For some reason, I don’t remember the things I read when I read non-fiction books. Lucky me, I didn’t have a lot of books to read when I was a student!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. July 4, 2017 at 4:43 pm

    Loved this, so much so I refused to read Ourednik’s other books as I was certain they couldn’t be as good as this. It must be a one-off!

    Thanks to twitter discussion about your billet Emma I am reassured and plan to look at his others.

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  4. July 5, 2017 at 11:41 am

    I loved this (and thanks for circulating a link to my review on twitter, very kind). It’s just so odd, so itself. I don’t know anything else quite like it though I’ll check out The Opportune.

    “What’s new is how he assembles facts and how he lines them up like beads on a necklace. ” Quite; that’s a nice way of putting it. And yes, the Eastern European perspective does make a difference too I think. This isn’t history as we usually have it where things make narrative sense and we all make progress despite the occasional (admittedly sometimes serious) setback. It’s too messy and complex and absurd to be captured in ordinary narrative.

    In other words: “It questions the idea of history, how we tell it, how we highlight some facts and not others and how this choice affects the global picture that we have of an era.” I couldn’t have put it better (in fact, I didn’t put it better).

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    • July 6, 2017 at 1:39 pm

      I’m glad I could share your review through Twitter.

      Ourednik is a member of the Oulipo movement. It explains the strange structure of Europeana and the feeling that history is absurd. There’s no real sense of direction, that’s the feeling you get from the book. It’s not that events are not linked and generating consequences. They’re not totally random facts because you can see some of them coming but still. There’s a sense of absurdity and oddity that is totally different from the usual seriousness we use to approach historical facts.

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