Home > 2010, 21st Century, American Literature, Beach and Public Transports Books, Moore Edward Kelsey, Novel, TBR20 > The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore

The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore

The Supremes at Earl’s-All-You-Can-Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore (2013) French title: Les Suprêmes. Translated by Cloé Tralci

They are three. They are black. They are girlfriends. They live in a small town in the south of Indiana. They were in their twenties in the 1960s. They were a team. They were nicknamed The Supremes. Their names are Odette, Clarice and Barbara Jean. They meet every Sunday after church at Earl’s-All-You-Can-Eat dinner. It’s been their spot for ages, they hung out there as giggling teenagers and kept coming with their husbands along the years.

Odette is not a delicate and flushing cattleya. Physically, she’s a chubby woman with wild hair and  an awkward sense of fashion. Mentally, she’s a strong, opinionated and capable woman. She sounded more like a Denise to me. She doesn’t beat around the bush and while it might irritate others, she’s precious for it. Because Odette takes charge. She calls a spade a spade and makes people talk. She states the obvious, meddles if needed and she exposes things. She’s the one who’ll ask the questions nobody dares to ask but need to be asked. She helps people get and sort things out.

Clarice is a piano teacher, one who had a great talent that went to waste when she abandoned her career to get married to Richmond. He dazzled her. He’s a womanizer, a professional flirt and sometimes a boy in a man’s body. And after decades of marriage with him cheating on her, Clarice is still dazzled. She accepts her fate as a scorned woman and lets it slide, even if it hurts a lot. Her attitude is consistent with her education and her childhood. Her father was the same and her mother taught her that the only respectable attitude was to turn a blind eye to it. Her friends know but won’t talk about it.

To me, Barbara Jean was like a black Norma Jean. Too pretty and attractive for her own good. Struggling with a complicated childhood and raised by a mother who was almost a prostitute. She’s the one who married Lester, a much older man. She went for financial and emotional security and with her past, who could blame her? She made her choice and stood by it. She’s the one who had the most tragedies in her life.

As the book progresses, we learn more about their life, present and past. They are ordinary women, none of them is a Helen of Troy, someone men start wars over. They are us, middle-class people with their small lives. They’re in their fifties now. The children are gone, health issues make appearances. These three working women are in a new chapter of their lives.

Through them, Moore portrays the story of the black middle-class. He doesn’t make it about being black but with details here and there, we see the life of black people in this era. You’re white, you don’t work for a black man. You’re a black girl, dating a white guy is so off-limit that it’s impossible to conceive, even in more advanced cities of the North. You’re the first black baby to be born in a hospital, you make the front page of the newspaper. Some neighborhoods are not for you. You might come from a poor background, your black bourgeois mother-in-law-to-be accepts you immediately because the color of your skin is light brown and that’s the criteria that matters the most. Subtle but telling details.

Moore gives us a vivid picture of this small town and this group of friends. The Supremes is about friendship and the things you say and the things you don’t, to keep the peace. It’s about marriage and the things that happen in a couple that are invisible from outside. It’s about the dramas of life, loosing a child, trusting a spouse and being sick. But it’s also about delighting in small daily pleasures and have your friends around when things get tough. The characters are lovely, I wanted to hear about them, to know what would happen to them. They felt like acquaintances.

The Supremes at Earl’s-All-You-Can-Eat is a great book that celebrate friendship and the warmth and the treasure it is in our lives.

  1. July 6, 2017 at 4:03 pm

    When I caught the first part of the title, I thought it was about a concert: The Supremes at Earl’s Court in London or something… It sounds like a good exploration of female friendships and the black middle classes who are not that frequently portrayed in literature or films.

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    • July 8, 2017 at 8:27 pm

      I liked it a lot. It’s not a masterpiece of literature but it’s a good read. He managed to get me attached to the characters. It’s a tribute to this black middle class, I think.

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  2. July 7, 2017 at 1:51 am

    I would give this one a pass on the title alone.

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    • July 8, 2017 at 8:23 pm

      Why? What’s wrong with this title?

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      • July 8, 2017 at 10:29 pm

        There’s this sub genre or strain or whatever here: the Sweetness at the Bottom of the Mouldy Pie Bookclub sort of thing.

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        • July 10, 2017 at 8:36 pm

          That’s when knowing the publisher becomes handy. The Supremes is published by Actes Sud, an excellent independant publisher. They would never pick potatoe pealing book lovers or librarians going off to Iowa. They always publish good literary fiction and their “fluff titles” are literary enough.
          The more I read, the more I rely on the quality of the publishers.

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