Home > 2010, 21st Century, Australian Literature, Barry Max, Beach and Public Transports Books, Challenges, Dystopian Fiction, TBR20, Thriller > AusReadingMonth: Lexicon by Max Barry – “Words are weapons sharper than knives”

AusReadingMonth: Lexicon by Max Barry – “Words are weapons sharper than knives”

November 1, 2019 Leave a comment Go to comments

Lexicon by Max Barry (2013) Not available in French.

Wil Parke is brutally kidnapped at Chicago airport. A mysterious team takes him to the lavatories and try to make him confess his true identity. He doesn’t know what this is all about. He’s a carpenter and his girlfriend is waiting for him at the arrivals. That’s all he knows. Things get violent quite fast and a man named Tom explains that their pursuants are “poets”, members of an organisation where leaders take the name of famous dead poets.

A mass killing happened a year before in Broken Hill, Australia. The whole population of the town was killed. Officially, it’s due to industrial leakage but the organisation knows that their agent Virginia Woolf went there with a weapon of mass destruction. She escaped and Wil is the only other survivor. He seems to be immune to the weapon. Problem 1: The weapon is still in Broken Hill and nobody can approach it without dying. Problem 2: Virginia Woolf is on the loose and she’s very dangerous. Poor Wil finds himself in the crossfire of two different factions among the poets and has to fight for his life.

Lexicon alternates chapters between the ongoing man hunt and Virginia Woolf’s story. Her name was Emily Duff. She was a sixteen-year old girl playing tricks on the streets in San Francisco when she was recruited to attend a special school near Washington DC. The school head is a poet, Charlotte Brontë. Her teachers are Lowell and Eliot. At the school, students learn the art of manipulating people’s minds. This is Emily’s epiphany:

But the truth was, she had just figured it out. Attention words. A single word wasn’t enough. Not even for a particular segment. The brain had defences, filters evolved over millions of years to protect against manipulation. The first was perception, the process of funnelling an ocean of sensory input down to a few key data packages worthy of study by the cerebral cortex. When data got by the perception filter, it received attention. And she saw new that it must be like that all the way down: There must be words to attack each filter. Attention words and then maybe desire words and logic words and urgency words and command words. This was what they were teaching her. How to craft a string of words that would disable the filters one by one, unlocking each mental tumbler until the mind’s last door swung open.

The poets master the art of “compromising” people, meaning that they take control over their minds and make them do what they want. Students learn languages, psychology and neuroscience. People are put into narrow segments, each segment reacts to certain words that make their mental walls collapse, enabling the poet to take over their mind. This is what it feels like:

Vartix velkor mannik wissick. Be still.”

Her mouth snapped closed. It happened before she realised what she was doing. The surprise was thet it felt like her decision. She really, genuinely wanted to be still. It was the words. Yeats, compromising her, she knew, but it didn’t feel like that at all. Her brain was spinning with rationalisations, reasons why she should definitely be still right new, why that was a really good move, and it was talking in her voice. She hadn’t known compromise was like this.

Frightening power, isn’t it?

What happened to Emily? Are Wil and Eliot right to be afraid of Virginia Woolf? Or should they be more concerned about Yeats, the director of the organisation? The two branches of the story converge in the end, giving the reader a whole picture of what happened. It is hard to give more details about the plot without giving away too much. This blog is spoiler free, so…

In Lexicon, Max Barry explores the power of language and how people can be manipulated. He imagines that the most lethal weapon is a word, a word so powerful that people die around it. The leaders of the organisation are poets because they are good with words. At their school, students have to learn to control their mind. They know they could be “compromised” and they know how to do it to others. They are taught to mask their feelings. Desires are unwanted, even basic ones like the desire to love and be loved. Desires are weaknesses and poets must keep their thoughts under a tight leash.

Emily is somehow resistant to it. She grew up cheating to survive and this instinct stays strong in her. Eliot never managed to tame his natural tendency to empathy. In the eyes of perfectly controlled Yeats, Eliot is weak. These two have one thing in common: they bend the rules because they don’t have the same ironclad control that the others have.

Lexicon plays with the idea of dominating people by feeding them words so well chosen that they target specific responses. Poets do what ill-intention press does, what social network can do, as the Cambridge Analytica scandal showed us. The master idea behind the organisation is that if you manage to attach someone to his adequate psychological segment, you’ll know how to get to him.

Now I have a question for English literature specialists. I’m not a good reader of poetry, not even in French, so I don’t know well Anglophone poetry either. Of course, I know about Yeats, Charlotte Brontë, Virginia Woolf, TS Eliot and other poets mentioned in the book. What I don’t know is what their names trigger in a British or American mind. Is it normal that the dissident poet is TS Eliot? Does it mean something that the cold, unfeeling and repressed leader is named Yeats? For example, when Yeats-the character says this…

“When I experience base physiological needs for food, water, air, sleep, and sex, I follow protocols in order to satisfy them without experiencing desire. Yes, it’s funny.”

“You fucking what?”

“It’s required to maintain a defence against compromise. Desire is weakness. I’m sure I explained this.”

…does it make any sense compared to Yeats-the-real-poet? I’d be grateful for a little bit of insight. I’m afraid I missed some subtext.

Lexicon is the kind of dystopian fiction you want to have on a long plane journey. It’s a page-turner, it’s entertaining and it makes you think.

This is my fifth Max Barry after Company, about the absurdity of corporate life and management methods (anyone in HR should read it), Syrup, about marketing and the launch of a new soda on the market, Jennifer Government, about consumerism, Machine Man, about transhumanism. All books are dystopian fiction and work around an angle of our contemporary societies. My favourite ones are Company and Jennifer Government. A new novel, Providence is expected in March 2020.

For another review of Lexicon, read Guy’s here. Thanks again, Guy, for introducing me to Max Barry. I also read it as my participation to Brona’s AusReadingChallenge. It’ll last the whole month of November.

  1. November 1, 2019 at 10:27 am

    I wish I could answer your question about the poets: I’d need to know more than I do about their lives to be able to do that. Sorry!

    Like

    • November 1, 2019 at 12:20 pm

      If you have no clue, who will? 😊 Besides the author, of course. Maybe I should ask him on Twitter.

      Like

      • November 2, 2019 at 2:15 am

        There must be lots of people… but my time with poetry was at uni last century!

        Like

        • November 3, 2019 at 1:34 pm

          Mine stopped in high school!

          Like

  2. November 1, 2019 at 6:01 pm

    Based on the quotation you include, and a little bit of poking around on the internet, the joke is that the poet-named characters are not at all like their namesakes. Even opposites, maybe.

    Like

    • November 3, 2019 at 1:31 pm

      Thanks Tom. That’s Marina Sofia’s opinion too.

      Like

  3. November 2, 2019 at 12:54 am

    I struggle with Literature in-jokes, but you are such a Barry fan that I am going to have to read one for myself. And poor old Broken Hill! What did it do to deserve such a fate? Hard on the truckies too who have to detour hundreds of kilometres to get around it.

    Like

    • November 3, 2019 at 1:33 pm

      Bill, if you’re willing to try Max Barry, start with Company or Jennifer Government.

      I don’t know why he picked Broken Hill. I looked it up to see if it was a real city and I was surprised to discover that it was.

      Like

  4. November 3, 2019 at 8:53 am

    From what you say, it sounds like the characters are practically the opposite if the perceived characters of their namesake poets. That must be the joke.

    Like

    • November 3, 2019 at 1:33 pm

      You and Tom seem to agree on this. Thanks! It’s helpful.

      Like

  5. November 4, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    No dissident doesn’t leap to mind when the name TS Eliot pops up. And Yeats no that’s not what I think of at all. I think they just made the names sort of meaningless

    Like

    • November 4, 2019 at 9:48 pm

      Or as Marina and Tom said, they’re the exact opposite of their namesakes.

      Like

  6. Vishy
    November 5, 2019 at 6:15 pm

    Wonderful review, Emma! I didn’t know that there was an Aussie Reading Month going on! So wonderful! On your question – “Does it mean something that the cold, unfeeling and repressed leader is named Yeats?” – I don’t think Yeats was all that, based on his poetry. His poetry is beautiful and warm and nostalgic. Maybe the characters in the story are the opposites of the poets, as Tom has said.

    Like

    • November 5, 2019 at 9:45 pm

      Yes, November is full of literary events : Aussie Reading Month, German Reading Month (not sure I’ll get along with Berlin Alexanderplatz), Non-fiction Month…

      Everyone seems to agree about the poets : the characters are the opposite of who the real poets were.

      Like

      • Vishy
        November 13, 2019 at 6:26 pm

        So fascinating! I discovered Aussie Reading Month and Nonfiction Month only now. Will plan better next year. I was actually planning to ask Lisa to host an Aussie Reading Month 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • November 13, 2019 at 11:16 pm

          Lisa does Indigenous Lit Week in June.

          Like

          • Vishy
            November 14, 2019 at 5:42 pm

            So nice! Will try to participate next year!

            Like

  1. No trackbacks yet.

I love to hear your thoughts, thanks for commenting. Comments in French are welcome

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: