Home > 2010, 21st Century, French Literature, History of Spain, Novella > Cry, Mother Spain by Lydie Salvayre

Cry, Mother Spain by Lydie Salvayre

December 7, 2019 Leave a comment Go to comments

Cry, Mother Spain by Lydie Salvayre. (2014) Original French title: Pas pleurer

This is my second mini-billet to vanquish the TBW –To Be Written— pile. I think there is a reason why Cry, Mother Spain by Lydie Salvayre stayed so long on my TBW. I don’t quite know how to write a billet about it and I kept procrastinating. Before diving into the book, one has to wonder how the French title that means No Crying or Don’t Cry became Cry, Mother Spain. The answer to that question is in Simon’s review of the book, here.

Lydie Salvayre is French but her parents were Spanish immigrants. In Pas pleurer, she comes back to her mother’s youth and how the Civil War in Spain changed her life forever. Her mother is named Montserrat Monclus Arjona, “Montse”, and she came from a small village in Spain. She and her brother José went to Barcelona in 1936, to help the Anarchist movement. An adventure and some bitter disappointments later, they are back to their village. This short time in Barcelona changed Montse’ life forever. In comparison to the liveliness and modernity of Barcelona, their village seems frozen in the Middle Ages with its rigid social hierarchy. Peasants remain dirt poor and under the rule of rich families. These immutable social rules remind me of what Mouloud Feraoun describes in The Poor Man’s Son. The 1936 Anarchist movement in Barcelona meant to take down these walls made of smothering traditions and free the country of rigid social conventions and religious constraints.

Lydie Salvayre shows how the hope of a revolution, of a new world with more social justice reached even small villages. Through Montse’s story, we see how Franco’s followers took over and the divides that this conflict created in communities. We see the personal fate of a young woman who embraced life in Barcelona and had to live with the repercussions of her actions. We see how women are often the first victims of conflicts and of society’s rules. We also understand how powerful the resistance to change can be, how inexperienced the young revolutionaries were. People’s fear of change always works in favor of the ones who preach immobilism.

In parallel to her mother’s story, Lydie Salvayre shares her reading of Les grands cimetières sous la lune, the non-fiction book in which Georges Bernanos relates the horror of the Spanish Civil War in Mallorca and how the Catholic Church was complicit of massacres. He was living there when it happened and had a front seat to it. I tried to read Bernanos almost three years ago but I couldn’t finish it. I didn’t like his tone, I didn’t know the people he was pointing at and it was more a pamphlet than calm-and-collected non-fiction. I missed the subtexts. I wished Bernanos had been more like Orwell.

Cry, Mother Spain is a poignant homage of a woman to her mother. Lydie Salvayre transcribes her mother’s creative French, the outcome of learning the language when she left Spain. She’s sometimes crude, sometimes funny as she mixes words. It’s the love of a daughter who gives her mother’s life a chance at eternity through literature. Cry, Mother Spain won the Goncourt prize in 2014 and it put the 1936 Civil War under mediatic lights.

I really recommend Simon’s review, which is a lot more thorough than mine and makes excellent justice to the book.

  1. December 7, 2019 at 4:50 pm

    How sad that her mother had to live in exile from her homeland. Thanks for linking to my post.

    Like

    • December 8, 2019 at 9:14 am

      She doesn’t say much about it in the book but I think the conditions in which the Spanish Republican refugees were treated in France was shameful.
      Especially since the Front Populaire was at the head of the country.

      Like

  2. December 8, 2019 at 7:55 am

    Hi Emma, this sounds like essential reading. Have you read Merce Rodereda? She’s very good on the impact of the Spanish Civil War on women. I’m sure it would be available in French because she’s such a notable writer. In English it’s called In Diamond Square or alternatively The Time of the Doves, and its Spanish title is La plaça del diamant.
    See https://anzlitlovers.com/2017/08/17/in-diamond-square-by-merce-rodoreda-translated-by-peter-bush/

    Like

    • December 8, 2019 at 9:23 am

      Hi
      Thanks for the recommendation. It’s available in French, indeed (La place du Diamant) and it sounds excellent.
      I’ll put it on my wish list.

      Like

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