Home > 2010, 21st Century, American Literature, Beach and Public Transports Books, Nisbet Jim, Noir, Polar > Snitch World by Jim Nisbet – San Francisco Noir

Snitch World by Jim Nisbet – San Francisco Noir

Snitch World by Jim Nisbet (2013) French title: Petit traité de la fauche. Translated by Catherine Richard-Mas

Klinger didn’t waste a moment. His door, being the one that had impacted the light pole, was jammed. So, as they’d been robbing liquor stores with the top down, since they couldn’t figure out how to get it up, he tried to step up and out of the stolen sports car with dignity. But the remnants of the airbag entangled his legs, and he and his dignity spilled headlong into the street.

And this, Ladies and Gentlemen, is Klinger, the main protagonist of Snitch World by Jim Nisbet. He’s a middle-aged thug, a weird concept because people should grow out of being a thug.

He and his accomplice Chainbang have just robbed a liquor store. They are in a car accident in the middle of the street, the police, the firemen and the paramedics are on their way. Klinger takes his share and ditches Chainbang, disappearing into the night while his partner is getting arrested. That’s Klinger for you.

He loves to drink and steals to pay for his booze and spend nights in cheap hotels, in North Beach, San Francisco. Nisbet takes us to this city, which seems to have turned its back to the counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s to fully embrace the tech era. Klinger is old school, he doesn’t even own a mobile phone. Walking down the SF streets, he gets reacquainted with Frankie, a pick-pocketing artist who was just released from prison.

Living in the tech world is Phillip Wong, a genius in programming and designing phone apps. He’s been working night and day for a start-up founded by Marcie, a girl he has a crush on. After working himself into exhaustion, he finally understood that Marcie took advantage of him and he decided to hop off the train.

Klinger and Wong’s worlds collide when Klinger and Frankie pick Phillip as their mark and accost him on the street. Klinger distracts him, Frankie visits his pockets. Problem: Phillip fights back and both he and Frankie are unconscious on the pavement when Klinger scurries for cover.

The next morning, Klinger reads in the paper about the aggression and that one man is dead and the other is in the hospital. Who is dead and who is alive? He gets his answer quickly when Marcie knocks on his hotel door. She has geolocated Phillip’s phone and she wants it bad as it is the key to his latest IT developments.

Klinger can’t say no to Marcie’s money and embarks in a fatal journey.

This is Noir territory. San Francisco is used as an atmospheric background and rain pours down on Klinger, the same kind of rain Chandler describes in Los Angeles. Nisbet takes us on the rainy streets of San Francisco, from Tenderloin to North Beach. We visit shabby bars and decrepit hotels that could not survive COVID-19 health code regulations.

Nisbet has a great sense of humor, he makes fun of this new world we’re in, with phone owning our lives and all the various apps we use. Klinger is out of his depth in this tech-dominated world.

Professional robbers don’t pick coat pockets anymore, Nisbet tells us. Marcie and her kind pick at other people’s brain and pocket the money. But since it’s technology, it’s socially acceptable.

As his name suggests it: Klinger clings to his old ways and to life. He’s always been a drifter and his main goals are to avoid jail and to get enough money for booze, food and a dry place to sleep. He’s not a very pleasant character, probably because he’s lazy, selfish and has no loyalty. I guess we can sympathize with a criminal who lives by his own moral code, provided that he has a code and abides by it.

I was invested in the story and wondered how it would end. I enjoyed Nisbet’s style and the barbs against the tech world that transformed San Francisco into one of the most expensive cities of the USA.

Recommended.

  1. May 23, 2020 at 4:39 pm

    I like the sound of a main character so out of step with the world, belonging to a time long past. The humour sounds very appealing too!

    Like

    • May 23, 2020 at 5:16 pm

      Jim Nisbet has a great style, there are funny passages about apps.
      I’ve read it in French, so I can’t include quotes that are not included in what I can get from a kindle sample.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Vishy
    May 24, 2020 at 12:35 am

    Wonderful review, Emma! This looks like an old-fashioned noir set in today’s world. So fascinating! I want to read this! Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    Like

    • May 24, 2020 at 10:21 am

      Thanks Vishy.
      It’s worth reading, the mix of Noir and humor is excellent. I wish I could have added more quotes, but I have the French translation.

      Like

  3. May 24, 2020 at 5:06 am

    This sounds great. I like old fashioned noir, when I come across it. And I like the parallels you point out with Marcie pick-pocketing people’s brains.

    Like

    • May 24, 2020 at 10:22 am

      I think Nisbet is a writer to pay attention to. You may stumble upon another of his books, he has a distinct tone and I enjoy writers who can squeeze themselves in a literary tradition and still be themselves.

      Like

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