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My French Film Festival : French films online for foreigners

January 25, 2018 6 comments

I usually don’t blog about films and I unfortunately don’t have enough free time to read and keep in touch with movies. But since readers of this blog are mostly foreigners who enjoy the French twist of my posts, I thought you might be interested in My French Film Festival.

It’s a film festival that lasts from January 19th until February 19th.  If you live out of France, you can watch francophone films on your computer or in some movie theatres. All short films are available for free. For other films, it is free in some countries and for the others, it will cost you €7.99 to have access to all the films. The aim is to help foreigners discover francophone film makers from France, Belgium, Canada and Switzerland. The films are available with subtitles in ten languages.

I know a lot of you are also interested in cinema and I thought I’d draw your attention to this event. Isn’t that a great initiative? Online films, available in a lot of countries, a festival affordable and available from your home. And you can participate, leave comments and vote for the films you liked most. For more details, see the festival’s about page here.

Let me know if you are interested, if you logged in and discovered new films. I’m happy this festival spreads francophone cinema around the world. Spread the word!

PS: Normal service with book billets will resume soon.

Categories: Personal Posts Tags:

Finding time to read thanks to novellas

January 20, 2018 32 comments

When you work full time, have a family and young children, it’s not easy to find time to read. Your schedule is so packed that you think longingly of those blessed years when reading was possible. Book lovers get frustrated. This was something we shared and regretted during a girls night out and I suggested to turn to novellas. I challenged these ladies to read at least one novella per month. And I committed to spread around a list around twelve recommendations of books with less than 200 pages. In the end, I ended up with a two tiered reading cake of twenty-four novellas.

Here’s the first layer, the first challenge:

English title French title Author Country
Agostino Agostino Alberto Moravia Italy
Journey Into the Past Voyage dans le passé Stefan Zweig Austria
Doctor Glas Docteur Glas Söderberg Sweden
Beside the Sea Bord de mer Véronique Olmi France
A Slight Misunderstanding La double méprise Prosper Mérimée France
In the Dark Room Dans la chambre obscure RK Narayan India
Play It As It Lays Maria avec et sans rien Joan Didion USA
Awakenings Eveils Gaetano Gazdanov Russia
The Murderess Les petites filles et la mort Alexandros Papadiamantis Greece
In the Absence of Men En l’absence des hommes Philippe Besson France
The Road La route Jack London USA
Three Horses Trois chevaux Erri de Luca Italy

And the second one:

English title French title Author Country
Not available Le mec de la tombe d’à côté Katarina Mazetti Sweden
Alien Hearts Notre cœur Guy de Maupassant France
Not available Crimes exemplaires Max Aub Mexico
The Bookshop L’affaire Lolita Penelope Fitzgerald UK
Rendezvous in Venice Le rendez-vous de Venise Philippe Beaussant France
Cheese Fromage Willem Elschott Belgium
The Man Who Walked to the Moon L’homme qui marchait sur la lune Howard McCord USA
Princess Ligovskaia La Princesse Ligovskoï Lermontov Russia
Not available Aline C-F Ramuz Switzerland
Fame Gloire Daniel Kehlman Austria
Not available Teen Spirit Virginie Despentes France
Not available Je dénonce l’humanité Férenc Karinthy Hungary

Pick and miw is allowed, of course. I thought I’d share the lists in the hope that it might helped other readers pressed with time. It might be an opportunity to discover good novels and new writers. And I hope they’ll have the impression that they keep in touch with books and literature, even if they have limited time for it.

What you do do when life eats up your reading time?

What about a book blogger meeting at Quais du Polar?

January 4, 2018 16 comments

I’ve been writing up my days at Quais du Polar for a few years now. Here are my billets from the 2017 edition (Days 1, Day 2, Day 3) For newcomers, what’s Quais du Polar? It’s a crime fiction festival organized in Lyon, France. During three days, the city celebrates crime fiction through conferences, signatures, exhibitions and games.

There’s a huge bookshop set up in the Chamber of Commerce. Only independent bookstores are allowed to have a stand and sell books there. They also host writers for book signings.

Interviews, conferences and meetings are scheduled all over the weekends in the Chamber of Commerce, in a nearby church, in the City Hall or at the 19th century Italian theatre. All gorgeous places.

A crime fiction game is organized in the city center: the participants have an investigation to do by walking around the city, looking for clues and solving enigmas. More information on the Quais du Polar web site.

This year, the festival will take place from April 6th to April 8th and I encourage you to come.

“Why should I come?”, you may wonder.

If you’re a crime fiction lover, it’s a great opportunity to meet writers. In 2017, they were more than 120 from 23 different nationalities! The atmosphere is relaxed, writers seem to have fun and to be happy to interact with readers. The French read a lot of crime fiction, they have a good public here. See here the list of writers for 2018.  (I suspect it’s still under construction and that more will join in.)

It’s also a chance to attend to conferences where writers interact with each other. For example, in 2017, I attended a meeting where Jo Nesbø, Arnaldur Indridason, Oliver Norek, Sara Gran, Deon Meyer and Craig Johnson discussed their recurring characters. How lucky we were to have them all on the same stage! They were as much impressed to be in each other’s company as we were to listen to them.

“But I don’t speak French!”, you may say.

Not a problem. All the conferences are translated into English. They hand you headsets at the entrance and a translator will translate everything live. The marvels of our modern ages.

“It’s expensive to go to such a festival”, you could rightfully object.

True. You have to fund transportation, lodgings and food.

I will just say that there are lots of low cost flights to Lyon Saint-Exupéry Airport and lots of train arrive to La Part-Dieu station. You have a tram from the airport to the city center and then you’re good. All the major events of the festival are at walking distance. The conferences are free, there aren’t any entrance fees and you can attend as many as you want. For 30€, you can also become a member of Quais du Polar. You will receive a free book, a poster of the festival and you’ll have a card that will allow you to cut the lines to enter the conferences. Very useful.

Budget concerns are why I publish this billet this early: it’s easier to get cheap tickets.

“What’s in it for you if I come?”, you may ask

Nothing but the pleasure of your company. It’s a wonderful event I’d like to share with fellow book bloggers. This year, I thought I’d ask if anybody’s interested to come. We could meet up for diner, see each other in real life and spend a nice evening together around books.

And, last but not least: Lyon is in a festive mood for three days. It doesn’t attract as many visitors as the Fête des Lumières but 80 000 visitors are already a good score. Lyon is a beautiful city, the place where the cinema was invented, the city where Antoine de Saint-Exupéry was born and where Frédéric Dard lived from 1929 to 1949. The city is worth seeing in itself.

Let me know if you’re interested, in the comments below, via Twitter at @Bookaround or by email at bookaroundthecornerATgmailDOTcom.

I’m just gathering intentions at the moment, to see if it’s a good idea or not. I hope some of you are tempted. 🙂

2017 in books: highlights of my reading year.

January 2, 2018 31 comments

Let’s face it, the TBR is still out of control. I read 56 books in 2017, half of them came from my TBR, the rest were new acquisitions. Oh well, they’ll keep, all these books, right?

My Reading Bingo billet already gave you a vision of my reading year through my bingo card. This is a more personal list of categories to highlight part of my 2017 literary journey.

The book I’d love to find a translator for.

Les harmoniques by Marcus Malte. This crime fiction book resonates with the sultry notes of a jazz club in a black and white movie and dives into the horrors of the war in ex-Yugoslavia. A tribute to jazz, to classic noir novels and films and a sobering reminder of that war.

The book that may change your vision of the emigrants that run aground on the coasts of Sicily.

In Eldorado, Laurent Gaudé shows us two sides of the problem. Through the eyes of an Italian naval officer, we see the weight of rescuing so many people and finding so many bodies. Through the eyes of an immigrant, we see what they’re ready to live through to get to Europe. A very moving book that puts this delicate question at human’s height

A 1930s book that reminded me of Trump’s America.

A Cool Million by Nathanael West. A rotten politician tells speeches whose rhetoric sounds like Trump. Chilling.

A book that will show you another side of Paris.

In Black Bazaar, Alain Mabanckou takes the reader in the black communities in Paris. His vivid descriptions of the 19th arrondissement in Paris will walk you away from the museum Paris that tourists see first.

The book that blurs the lines between literary fiction and crime fiction.

Elle by Philippe Djian. I’m a huge Djian fan and he gets better as years go by. Elle is one of his bests with Michèle as a venomous femme fatale.

Bleak but brilliant.

Caribou Island by David Vann. I wasn’t initially attracted to Vann’s books because they seemed too bleak for me. But after hearing his interview at Quais du Polar, I decided to give this one a try. And I’m so glad I got over my reservations. Alaska is not a place you want to visit after reading Caribou Island, though. The cover of the French edition is stunning as it pictures perfectly the relationship of the older married couple.

Books with unexpected modernity.

I never expected the feminist streak of The Dark Room by RK Narayan and Doctor Glas by Söderberg raises questions about the right to conjugal duty, euthanasia and birth control that I never suspected in a book published in 1905. Both books are novellas and their writers managed to say a lot in a few pages.

Journey into the past.

Monsieur Proust by Céleste Albaret. Proust’s last housekeeper relates her memories of her years at his service. It pictures an outmoded world that died with WWI. She was too fond of him to be objective in her stories but she doesn’t hide his flaws. What a pain he must have been. A fascinating one, certainly, but still a pain with his upside-down way-of-life.

Most crazy book in its plot and characters.

Aller simple by Carlos Salem. Sadly, it’s not available in English. It’s a crazy road trip through Marocco and Spain with a poor fellow who’s afraid to be charged for the murder of his wife and the ghost or reincarnation of the famous tango singer Carlos Gardel.

Best blind date with a book.

Dominique Sylvain was present at Quais du Polar. When I discovered that she comes from my region and that The Dark Angel opens with a quote by Romain Gary, I had to read it. Billet to come where you’ll encounter a great duo of female investigators.

Best Sugar Without Cellulite Book

The Three Miss Kings by Ada Cambridge. I finished it on December 31st and I will write the billet in a couple of weeks. It reminded me of The Romance of a Shop by Amy Levy. It’s one of those 19th century books about love and marriage with incredible twists and turns.

Worst reading experience of the year.

Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James. Truly awful, a crime to fiction, to quote my billet.

The billet you liked the most.

Last year, your favorite billet had been Literature in relation to American paintings in the 1930s. This year, it is Book recommendations needed: Australian literature. It was inspiring, I received recommendations for 80 different books.

The billet you missed.

Not a lot of comments or likes for Letters from England by Karel Čapek and I find it unfair. It’s a short book about his travels in Great-Britain. It’s delightful and witty.

A book for the Romain Gary aficionado that I am.

In Un certain M. Pielkieny, François-Henri Désérade writes an autofiction book about looking for M. Piekielny, a person mentioned in Gary’s autobiographical book, Promise at Dawn. Billet to come. I loved it.

 

 

2017 has been a good reading year, but not an excellent one. I didn’t read any Thomas Hardy, and I still want to read all of his books. My work life has been quick paced and it drained part of my energy. I turned to easy books and tried to read in French as much as possible. It took me a month to read the 750 pages of Bánffy’s They Were Counted. I hope I’ll be able to read more engaging books in 2018. As mentioned in my Happy New Year billet, I will read at least one Australian book per month among my selection and my Book Club reads. (The list is here, if you’re curious about it)

If you published your Best of 2017 already, links in the comments are welcome. And of course, I’m curious: what are your reading plans for 2018?

The grapes of hope: Happy New Year 2018

January 1, 2018 22 comments

In my family, we eat grapes for New Year because tradition says it brings wealth for the coming year. So the grapes on the picture are not the grapes of wrath although they could be after this challenging political year. They are the grapes of hope. I’m sending virtual grapes to you for this brand new year.

I will write a Best of 2017 post in the coming days. Out of superstition, I didn’t want to post it before the year actually ended. What if I finished a fantastic book after the post was published? Well this year, I was glad for this foresight because I ended up reading two greats books in the last few days, The Dark Angel by Dominique Sylvain and The Three Miss Kings by Ada Cambridge.

I want to say hi to the readers who joined Book Around the Corner in 2017 and to the faithful ones who keep reading about my literary adventures. I am grateful that you choose to read me among the billions things you have to do and I will do my best to entertain you in 2018. Your presence and interactions make my reading journey a lot brighter.

The billet where I asked for recommandations in Australian literature is the one that attracted the most “likes” and the highest number of comments, so we’ll see what I’ll make of them in 2018. So, my only reading plans for 2018 are to read my Book Club choices and read at least one Australian book per month.  And of course, if the TBR could decrease…

I will try to read more of you blogs too as I enjoy discovering new writers and reading about your literary voyage. I don’t have as much time as I’d like to read all the reviews I’d like to.

I wish you all the best for 2018, for you and your family, especially health and happiness. And money too, because, if money doesn’t bring health or happiness, let’s be honest, it sure contributes to them. 🙂

Categories: Personal Posts Tags:

Joyeux Noël – Merry Christmas! Stories to read by the Christmas Tree

December 24, 2017 11 comments

Merry Christmas! Stories to read by the Christmas tree (2015) Original French title: Joyeux Noël ! Histoires à lire au pied du sapin.

This year my seasonal Christmas read was Merry Christmas! Stories to read by the Christmas tree. It’s a slim book that belongs to the Folio 2€ collection, a series of paperback books published by Gallimard with a length and price constraint. They aren’t longer than 120 pages and they cost 2€. I’ve bought several titles from this collection, I find it a good way to discover new writers.

This Joyeux Noël! opus is divided into three sections, Christmas Eve, Christmas day and a memory of Christmas past. Each part opens with a poem and continues with short stories from various authors.

I have to confess that I skipped A Christmas Tree by Dickens (1850) because of the lengthy description of a Christmas tree. There was no breather in the text, barely a paragraph here and there. I enjoyed Les fées by Sylvain Tesson (The Fairies), a short story set in Brittany and about a man whose views on the existence of fairies will be changed during a Christmas night.

Pat Hobby’s Christmas Wish by F-S. Fitzgerald (1940) is one of the Pat Hobby short stories that Fitzgerald wrote for Esquire in 1940-1941. In this one, Pat Hobby, a lowly screenwriter in Hollywood tries to blackmail his producer…As always Fitzgerald’s chiseled irony is a gem.

Our Christmas tour takes us to Russia with a poignant tale by Anton Chekov. Aging illiterate parents decide to ask someone in their village to send a letter to their estranged daughter who left to Petersburg with her husband. Then we’re back in France with Marcel Aymé who brought some magic in military barracks during Christmas night. Then Maupassant tells us a story of possession and exorcism that I didn’t enjoy despite his flawless prose.

My favorite one is A Christmas Memory by Truman Capote. We’re somewhere in the South of the United States in the 1930s. Buddy is seven and his parents don’t know how to relate to him and entertain him. He has a special friend for that, though. She’s a distant cousin who’s in her sixties. She and Buddy prepare Christmas together, scrapping money to make cakes for friends and people they admire (They always send one to Eleanor Roosevelt), decorating a Christmas tree with home-made decorations and making each other a kite as Christmas present. It’s the lovely story of the strong bond between a little boy and an older woman, someone who brings him the affection he needs. To know more about Truman Capote’s Christmas story, have a look at Ali’s post here.

This little book helped me transition from fast-paced work days to this festive time of year. I wish you all a Merry Christmas. I hope you’ll have a good time with friends and family, that you’re doing well and enjoying the holidays.

 

Reading Bingo 2017

December 14, 2017 18 comments

Reading Bingo is back, according to Cleo at Cleopatra Loves Books. The idea is simple: try to find a book you’ve read this year and that fits into the bingo card. I don’t have much time to do that, to be honest, but I find it entertaining. It’s also a way to remind you of billets you might have missed about books you might enjoy. I don’t read much compared to other book bloggers but apparently my reading tastes are eclectic because I manage to find a book for almost all the squares.

A Book with more than 500 pages : They Were Counted by Miklos Bánffy, the saga of a family at the turning of the 20th century in Transylvania, Hungary at the time, Romania today. The first volume is 750 pages long, there are two more of them.

A forgotten classic : I don’t know if The Dark Room by RK Narayan is a forgotten classic but I don’t think I’ve seen a review of this book on another blog and yet, it’s worth reading. This is the story of an Indian woman trapped in her housewife life. For a book written by a man in 1935, I find it very feminist.

A Book That Became a Movie: Elle by Philippe Djian has been made into a film by Paul Verhoeven with Isabelle Huppert in the lead role. The film won a Golden Globe Award in Best Foreign Language Film and a César. I haven’t seen the film but Isabelle Huppert is a good fit for Michèle, the character of Djian’s novella.

A Book Published This Year: I rarely buy books that have just been published. I find them expensive and I like to wait after all the buzz is gone to read a book. But given my love for all things Romain Gary, I had to read Un certain M. Piekielny by François-Henri Désérade, a book based on the quest for a character in Promise at Dawn.

A Book With A Number In The Title: Thirteen Ways of Looking by Colum McCann.

A Book Written by Someone Under Thirty: Edouard Louis was that young when he wrote The End of Eddy, a book based on his childhood.

A Book With Non Human Characters: At first I thought I had not read any book with non human characters. Then I remembered that No Word From Gurb by Eduardo Mendoza has an alien as a main character and that an owl played a crucial role in one Craig Johnson’s short-stories. (Wait for Signs. Twelve Longmire Stories). And I’ve read books with an animal in the title. I tried to read Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut. I loved the grim Caribou Island by David Vann. And The Duck Hunt by Hugo Claus is deserves a special prize for desolate and bleak stories. But at least I had fun with My Life as a Penguin by Katarina Mazetti.

A Funny Book: No Word From Gurb by Eduardo Mendoza. An Extra-terrestrial lands in Barcelona just before the 1992 Olympic Games. We follow his journal and his discovery of human way-of-life. Hilarious.

A Book By A Female Author: I’ve read several books by female authors but I choose Lady Audley’s Secret by M.E. Braddon because she was a writer at a time when it wasn’t so easy for a woman to be an author.

 

A Book With A Mystery: Let’s choose a seasonal read: A New York Christmas by Anne Perry. It was a nice cozy crime fiction where Jemima Pitt plays amateur detective in New York.

A Book With A One Word Title: I had several books with a one word title but I wanted to draw your attention to Corrosion by Jon Bassoff. The billet about this book didn’t get a lot of readers and it’s a pity for Bassoff very dark debut crime fiction novel.

 

A Book of Short Stories: Datsunland by Stephen Orr is a collection of short stories set mostly in Australia.

Free Square: I decided to use my free square to present a book that is a translation tragedy, ie a book not available in English. My favorite of the year is probably Harmonics by Marcus Malte, a haunting crime fiction story with a jazz background and a link to the war in ex-Yugoslavia.

 

A Book Set on a Different Continent: I asked recommendations for Australian literature and gathered a huge list. I’ve started with My Brilliant Career by Miles Franklin.

A Book of Non-Fiction : Not hesitation there, it will be Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell, the book about his experience in the Spanish Civil War in 1936/1937.

The First Book by a Favourite Author

Monsieur Proust by Céleste Albaret. It is her first book about one of my favorite authors. That’s a stretch, I know. It’s a lovely book written on the basis of Céleste Albaret’s memories of her life as Proust’s governess.

A Book You Heard About Online: Datsunland by Stephen Orr came as a review copy from Wakefield Press, an Australian publisher.

A Best-selling Book: Was Thirteen Ways of Looking successful enough to be a best selling book? I don’t follow those lists much and usually, the more I hear about something in the press, the less tempted I am to read it.

A Book Based on a True Story: The Arab of the Future by Riad Satouf. This is a graphic novel where Satouf tells his childhood in Libya and Syria. His mother is French and his father Syrian.

 

A Book at the Bottom of you To Be Read Pile: The Romance of the Mummy by Théophile Gautier. Pfft. It’s short but reading it seemed to last a lifetime. Gautier is not a writer for me.

 

A Book Your Friend Love: A warm hello from France to the friend who shipped me Heed the Thunder by Jim Thompson.

 

A Book That Scares You: A Cool Million by Nathanael West, a book that reminded me of Donal Trump and that’s scary enough.

 

 

A Book That Is More Than Ten Years Old: Random pick because I read a lot of books that are more than ten years old. So it will be Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day by Winifred Watson. It’s lovely, witty and a nice sugary ride in London in the 1930s.

 

The Second Book in a Serie: Sorry, I have nothing for this one.

 

A Book With a Blue Cove: Eldorado by Laurent Gaudé. I was blown away by Gaudé’s story about some immigrants’ journey to Europe and about life in on the coast of Italy where boats full of immigrants arrive after braving the Mediterranean Sea. It stayed with me.

That’s all for this year! I hope you enjoyed playing Reading Bingo with me. If you’ve done your own Reading Bingo post, please leave the link to your in the comment section.

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